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Starbucks Is Opening its Biggest Location in the World and Promises ‘Coffee as Theater’

Starbucks Is Opening its Biggest Location in the World and Promises ‘Coffee as Theater’

Starbucks’ second Roastery location will also double as its largest store in the world, and is scheduled to open in New York

It’s the Willy Wonka factory of caffeine.

Starbucks has announced the opening of its largest location in the entire world, set to open its doors in 2018 in New York City.

The store, at a colossal 20,000 square feet (compared with the original Seattle location’s 15,000 square feet), will also double as the second-ever Starbucks Roastery and Tasting Room, containing elite beans and brews from around the world to appeal to coffee connoisseurs.It will be opening in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, just south of Chelsea market.

Visitors will be able to purchase small-lot coffees and learn about the coffee-making and brewing processes, and Starbucks promises a “deeper level of interaction” than just simply asking baristas for a “tall venti macchiato no whip,” and will experience “coffee as theater.”

“In New York, we want to take elements from what we originally created and build something even bigger and bolder, celebrating coffee and craft in a completely unique and differentiated way,” Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, said in a statement. “We want this experience to tell our customers that we’re coming to Broadway.”


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


Spending This Season: What's New in the Shop Windows

TRENDS on the East End are as fleeting as summer romances. Just look at the businesses that are here one season, gone the next.

Over all, however, it appears that more businesses are trying to stay open all year instead of closing after Labor Day. In addition, more retailers are moving west on the South Fork, expanding to Westhampton Beach, as East Hampton and Southampton become saturated.

On the more subdued North Fork, business centers on community events, wineries, antiques and waterways. Greenport, the business center of the North Fork, has become more stable, and like Westhampton Beach, new businesses are catering to an upscale summer crowd.

If a friend you haven't seen in a long time asks, ''What's new?'' here are some answers.

Westhampton Beach is picking up speed. The Performing Arts Center, which opened last year, has helped to bring new businesses to the village.

Margarita Grille, across the street from the theater, is likely to be the focal point on Main Street. A renovated Victorian building with a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by shops, it will be the place to people watch. The owner, George Malamas of Westhampton Beach, will keep it open all year, serving casual fare for lunch and dinner.

Roseline Koener Art Gallery at 88 Main Street plans to show many European artists. The gallery offers lovely catalogues printed in Belgium, her home country, and has art workshops for all ages. Stop by for Sunday brunch.

Carol Wolper wanted peace and quiet. Ms. Wolper ran a large surf shop in Sayville for 13 years. When she moved to Westhampton Beach in January, she looked around Main Street. There were already two surf shops, so she opened Summer Salts, specializing in swimwear and California casuals for women. The store is a hit with the local real estate ladies.

''We try to be authentic to the surf culture,'' said Shawn Mett, owner of Island Surf, which sells and rents surfboards and gives surfing lessons. ''Shoshanna was first to take a lesson,'' Mr. Mett said of the clothing designer Shoshanna Lonstein, formerly Jerry Seinfeld's girlfriend. Parents can drop off their children at the shop for an hour of private or group lessons at the beach.

The French clothing company Blanc Bleu has opened two new shops: a flagship American store on Main Street in East Hampton and an offshoot on Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Helga Schwarze bought the United States franchise from Blanc Bleu, which has 110 shops throughout Europe, most located in resort towns.

Craig and Isabelle Cohen wanted a restaurant and lounge they could feel comfortable in, while not spending $130 on dinner. Mr. Cohen, an accountant, said the couple was bored with the grilled tuna offered by high-end restaurants in the area. So when a century-old building at 190 Montauk Highway in Speonk became available, they dove in, naming the place Cantusa. Local artists painted landscape murals, and the chef, Vincent Barbuto, will cook up things like pretzel-battered chicken with beer sauce. The couple plan to add a cigar lounge with a separate entrance and musical entertainment geared toward an adult crowd.

Not too crazy, but definitely not boring, said Mr. Cohen, ''our dream come true.''

Bistro 26 has taken Hampton Bays by surprise. Formerly the Polo Grounds nightclub, known for brawls and a young, drinking crowd, Bistro 26, at 26 Main Street, serves classic bistro fare like braised short ribs. The partners, Jeff Kent and George Torres, broke the mold by opening after the summer season last year.

Southampton Inn, at 91 Hill Street, has been around a long time but the old place has had a face lift, thanks to the owner, Dede Gotthelf, and Coastal Hotel Management. The lobby is new, equipped with a library, overstuffed couches and a concierge. All 90 rooms have new bathrooms, and there's a new pub serving poolside cocktails.

Jennifer Hoar has designed couture fabrics for Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden. Ms. Hoar decided she would rather be a big fish in a small sea as opposed to a small fish in a big sea, so she will present her own line this week in Southampton at Mi Vida, her new shop, at 60 Jobs Lane. Her silk summer dresses, Ms. Hoar said, feel like nothing on. Now that's lively.

Arthur Diamond and Constantine Patsimas come from Great Barrington, Mass., but they scour the countryside looking for original and eclectic antiques for their new shop, Privet Cove, 41 Jobs Lane. Everyone's doing knockoffs, Mr. Diamond said. ''I'm not knocking them. You can furnish your whole house. And then come here and get a Fairfield Porter.''

Biba Kids, 89 Jobs Lane, and Calypso, 24 Jobs Lane, are two East Hampton offshoots. Biba has funky adult styles for small children and Calypso has small children's styles for women. The shoe store on Jobs Lane is still there, but instead of being called the Boot Tree, it's now Jildor, which has three stores in Nassau County.

Touche Couture, on Main Street, is Cristine Cloaninger's second shop. Her first is on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivana Trump will feel right at home among the alligator and ostrich handbags, shoes, belts and home accessories in other exotic skins. Kim Basinger may skip the skins for the cashmere.

Don't worry if you spill lobster roll on your shirt. Head to Titano Shirtmaker at 27 Nugent Street. They have shirts for men and women, all-Egyptian cotton shirts, hand made in Italy, in different weaves, colors, cuts and cuffs.

If you want a tan, and like enclosed spaces, try Sunpoint, a new tanning salon on Windmill Lane.

Michael Carni of Shoreham opened two new businesses this season. Michael's of Water Mill Salon and Cafe Caprice, formerly known as the Cross Cut Cafe, 129 Noyac Road. Two local taverns shut down, Mr. Carni explained, so the logical thing was fill the void. Mr. Carni lowered the prices, and to encourage the local crowd Cafe Caprice offers fireman specials. Mr. Carni does not 'ɽo hair.'' He leaves that to local experts.

M-A-G, short for Magaschoni Apparel Group, is launching an attack on both sides of the Atlantic. Its first shop will open at 75 Main Street in East Hampton, with others to follow in New York City and London. Look for cashmere in all shapes, sizes and colors and freshwater pearls to top off the luxurious knits.

Rumrunner already has four locations in the Hamptons, but the home furnishings people have decided to reach out to the children's furniture market. ''Nobody's doing it out here,'' said the manager, Mark Lappin of Rumrunner Kid at 41 Main Street. If there's a gap, fill it.

There wasn't much of a gap at the Whitewash space across Main Street. Hampton Cards and Gifts jumped in there faster than you can say wrap it, please.

Promoters promise that Scoop Beach will resemble a fashion editor's closet. The owner, Stefani Greenfield, was seen directing men with shelves and other retail paraphernalia at 47 Newtown Lane, in a room with lots of stainless steel, and not much else, a few weeks ago. By now, Ms. Greenfield's third shop will be stocked with designers like Daryl K, Jade Jagger and Shoshanna.

The fashionable crowd meets at NV, on Three Mile Harbor Road. But when Frank Cilione first suggested that Tsunami, a restaurant, would open last fall and remain open through the winter at the nightclub location, some year-round residents thought Mr. Cilione knew something they didn't. That never happened. Tsunami is promised again, and just in time for the summer season.

A pub without smoke is a bit odd, so O'Mally's Pub on Montauk Highway did a smart thing. The only Hampton restaurant to add a smoking room, the pub has enclosed its bar area and added extra ventilation. Just what the smoker ordered.

Heaven Scent, a mecca of New Age information and gathering, has a new location, at 65 Montauk Highway. The store offers workshops on everything from past life regression to Classical Chi-Gong, an ancient Chinese art used to gently stretch and align the body.

Across the street, in the Red Horse Plaza, Lɺrt et Lɺutomobile deals in antique automotive memorabilia. Formerly in New York City, it carries racing posters dating as far back as the 1920's.

A few doors down, Lars Bolander Antiques has a new space overlooking a horse field. The shop specializes in 18th- and 19th-century Scandinavian, English and French furniture and home accessories.

Larry and Leslie Tell Hillel have created quite a niche for themselves with the Lysander House, 132 Main Street. According to Ms. Tell Hillel, who irons the pillowcases in the Victorian farmhouse, the niche has to do with Dux mattresses from Sweden. The location, the pristine attention to detail, and yogurt and oatmeal pancakes are a few reasons people will return to the bed-and-breakfast, after testing out the mattresses.

Hope Pingree of Shelter Island has turned her love of photography into a business. ''I've always collected photography,'' said the former Ralph Lauren executive. Pingree Gallery, specializing in 20th-century fine art photography, is on the second level of 66 Newtown Lane. It opens Friday.

Seeds for the East Hampton Golf Club, which were planted by the Bistrian family of Amagansett as early as 1978, are finally beginning to flourish, off Abrahams Path. The course, designed by Bill Coor and Ben Crenshaw, should be ready to play by Labor Day weekend. Crenshaw Golf's executive vice president, Jerry Diamond, said the 250 to 300 individual memberships would cost in the six figures.

John Heilmann, who came to Amagansett from the city for the quality of life, is not one to rely on the status quo. Homenature, his year-old Main Street shop, is redecorated every week. And it's no wonder, since inventory doesn't stick around too long. Elle Decor noted Homenature's surprising combination of antique furniture and contemporary accessories, and so do his customers, who can't seem to get enough.

Viveka Hagerstrom of Amagansett took over the gadget shop Brookstones, in the Amagansett Green, and named it Viveka. She will stock vintage Levis, trendy T-shirts and clothes from young designers like Daryl K, as well as her own sari-type pants and shawls.

Jeff Salaway and Mark Smith, the team that started Rowdy Hall in East Hampton, are going full steam ahead in the hospitality business. Their latest Hamptons project is a boutique hotel at 1655 County Road 39. You won't mind taking your shoes off in The Atlantic, a Utopia Lifestyle Inn, formerly the Sandpiper Motel. The streamlined design by Peter Van Sambeek features stainless steel and maplewood. Ninety rooms sit on four acres with pool and tennis, plus daily beach shuttles.

Club Colette, an offshoot of the private club in Palm Beach, has completed final renovations of its back room. The owner, Dan Ponton, has a variety of plans for the room, which has an oak bar and French doors that lead to a garden. It will have a life of its own, said Mr. Ponton, who hopes to offer fashion, jewelry and art exhibits during the day and live music and dancing at night.

Conscience Point is keeping its name, but three former party promoters bought the space. Jason Strauss, Noah Tepperberg and Billy Masterson have renovated the interior to have a cozier feel. The celebrity-driven club will serve light fare like tapas and pasta. To appease the neighbors, the outdoor deck will not be used, but a younger crowd will still be able to dance the night away.

Cantina Bar and Grill, at the Royal Atlantic Beach Resort, 126 South Emerson in Montauk, is shaping up to be a surfers' paradise. Opened only two weeks, this traditional Mexican cantina has already become a destination for locals and surfers, thanks to the lobster enchiladas of the chef, Craig Lieder Jr. Lunch is served poolside.

John Mahon and Brian Walsh are part owners of five Irish pubs and restaurants in Manhattan. While Napeague stretch may not exactly be a prime location, their third Pig 'n' Whistle will do fine for all of Mr. Mahon's and Mr. Walsh's friends and the overflow from Cyril's. Celtic tiling on the ceiling will add to the warm and friendly atmosphere, Mr. Walsh said. Pig 'n' Whistle East will include an outdoor patio, a raw bar and weekend entertainment, as well as seafood pot pie on the menu.

Nick's is the only restaurant and bar on the ocean in the town of East Hampton. Over the years, the multilevel establishment has had many names, but it's never changed much else. Why fix it if it isn't broken? Walk up to the take-out window in bare feet, or throw on the flipflops and head upstairs for fresh seafood overlooking the beach. Dance to live reggae bands and Montauk's favorite disk jockey, DJ Tom.

Larry's Lighthouse Marina in Aquebogue has gone fishing, in a big way. Larry Galasso's son, Alex Galasso, runs the family's 30-year-old boat business. After a break from boat sales, Mr. Galasso now represents the Phoenix and Century luxury boat lines.

Love Lane Sweetshop in Mattituck is the kind of place where people can pick up some local gossip, a gift, party supplies or just a piece of chocolate. The candy shop now has a larger space on Love Lane.

If you are wondering about that old vase you inherited from your great-aunt, don't miss Antique Appraisal Day, sponsored by the North Fork Antique Dealers Association, at the Mattituck Historical Society, Main Road, on July 31.

A great way to tour the North Fork is by bicycle. Country Time Cycle on Route 25 rents mountain bikes equipped with lock, rear rack, and water-bottle holder. Don't forget the helmet. Delivery and pick-up are available.

Ginger Tomaszewski and Tracy Ryan opened Scoops ice cream parlor in Cutchogue four years ago. Last year they added 1950's-style booths, and this year a candy counter equipped with a cotton candy machine. Next dooris The Little Toy Shop of Cutchogue. Across the street, on Main Road, the new Country Deli of Cutchogue has all the ingredients for a beach picnic, or just the morning paper and coffee.

The 350th-anniversary celebration of the Old House in Cutchogue promises to be the season's biggest event on the North Fork. Hillary Rodham Clinton has been invited to the Aug. 14 gala, which will include a flag-raising ceremony and parade, as well as a 1775 encampment.

Fast food has come to the North Fork. Fast on the heels of McDonald's, Taco Bell is now located in the A & P shopping center in Southold.

If you missed the fourth annual Lighthouse Cruise, sponsored by the East End Seaport, it is not too late to get aboard. The special cruise is offered in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Orient Lighthouse. Call the Seaport for the Orient cruise, slated for July 31, as well as advance notice of the year 2000 boat tour of eight different lighthouses. Jeff Colton, owner of Coastal Candleworks, said his goal was to illuminate people's lives. Mr. Colton hand-carves his candles at 110 Front Street. In the Buff, in Greenport, sells products you could use while in the buff, said the owner, Lisa Simendinger, previously of Baldwin. Ms. Simendinger's father bought a farm in the area and she saw a lot of potential. She carries trendy lines like Tony and Tina cosmetics and Get Fresh bath and beauty products. It is hard to miss In the Buff, at 204 Front Street it has a bathtub in the window.

Claudia and Steve Helinski are expanding their popular Salamander Cafe to include a takeout and retail space at 414 Front Street in Greenport. Mrs. Helinski will cook some of the same food she has been serving in the restaurant to take out. She will offer Asian greens grown locally by Sang Lee produce and organic sourdough bread baked by Peconic Bay Bakers.


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